William Seidman


Is working 9 to 5 really for losers?

I recently read an interesting article in the New York Times entitled In Silicon Valley, 9-5 Is for Losers. The gist of the article is that the high-tech culture in Silicon Valley values extreme work hours in order to potentially make a lot of money over all other values. As the article points out, even […]


finding managers

Google’s Oxygen project took months to find out what makes a manager great; Cerebyte takes a day

Recently, a colleague forwarded me an article about Google’s Oxygen project from Inc. Magazine. This is a well-known effort by Google to use statistical analysis of performance reviews to determine what makes someone a good manager. The Google team’s findings are hardly revolutionary but, because they are Google, they are treated as some great revelation. […]


Does sitting next to a “star” improve your performance?

Recently, I read an interesting article in the Wall Street Journal entitled “Use Your Seat to Get Ahead.” The subtitle of the article, “Sitting next to a star at work improves your performance,” particularly piqued my interest since we do a lot of work with star performers at Cerebyte. The gist of the article is […]


Does having a “sense of purpose” help you sleep?

As anyone who read this blog knows, I am an advocate of developing a compelling social purpose and aligning everything in your work and life with achieving that purpose. Recently, I wrote a blog about how purpose-driven approaches to learning in general and the Cerebyte methodology contribute to brain health. Now there’s another study that […]


Effectively Re-Training Displaced Workers

Today, workers often need to learn new skills for increasingly technical jobs. Re-training workers who have been displaced seems to be an ongoing need. We shared some advice about how to manage effective re-training programs in this article that’s just been published in Training Industry. Check it out for ideas for your organization.


“Why We Work”

I just finished reading a book entitled, “Why We Work” by Barry Schwartz. The book has three core messages that really resonated with me: – The evidence that purpose is the primary motivator of behaviors is overwhelming – The conventional wisdoms that formal, particularly financial incentives are the primary motivator of behavior is wrong and […]


Innovation can be systematically developed with the right tools

  I recently read an article in the New York Times about neuroscience and innovation titled, “Eureka? Yes, Eureka!” The article starts off by disputing a quote from Mark Zuckerberg about innovation. In his quote, Zuckerberg states that innovation does not occur in a single epiphany but as a result of lots of hard work. […]


Leadership learning programs: the good, the bad and the ugly

In the last week, I have had substantive interactions with three corporate universities (“U” for short) responsible for a wide variety of learning programs, one of which was incredibly vibrant, energetic and effective. The other two were low energy, clearly demoralized and ineffective. The contrast between the three programs was so sharp that it really […]


4 Neuroscience-Based Components of Engaging Leadership Development Programs

We are pleased to report that our article, 4 Neuroscience-Based Components of Engaging Leadership Development Programs, was recently published in Training Industry. In the article, we describe the four key components that make neuroscience-based leadership development programs so successful: a compelling purpose, path to mastery, practical exercises and applied social learning. For the full article, […]